John Keats

John Keats

John Keats (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) was an English Romantic poet. He was one of the main figures of the second generation of Romantic poets, along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite his works having been in publication for only four years before his death.

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I am in that temper that if I were under water I would scarcely kick to come to the top.

I am certain of nothing but the holiness of the heart's affections and the truth of imagination.

Philosophy will clip an angel's wings.

Here lies one whose name was writ in water.

There is an electric fire in human nature tending to purify - so that among these human creatures there is continually some birth of new heroism. The pity is that we must wonder at it, as we should at finding a pearl in rubbish.

Though a quarrel in the streets is a thing to be hated, the energies displayed in it are fine, the commonest man shows a grace in his quarrel.

You are always new the last of your kisses was ever the sweetest.

Do you not see how necessary a world of pains and troubles is to school an intelligence and make it a soul?

Land and sea weakness and decline are great separators but death is the great divorcer for ever.

'Beauty is truth, truth beauty' - that is all ye know on earth, and all ye need to know.

It appears to me that almost any man may like the spider spin from his own inwards his own airy citadel.

There is not a fiercer hell than the failure in a great object.

I love you the more in that I believe you had liked me for my own sake and for nothing else.

I will give you a definition of a proud man: he is a man who has neither vanity nor wisdom one filled with hatreds cannot be vain neither can he be wise.

I have two luxuries to brood over in my walks your loveliness and the hour of my death. O that I could have possession of them both in the same minute.

Praise or blame has but a momentary effect on the man whose love of beauty in the abstract makes him a severe critic on his own works.

My imagination is a monastery and I am its monk.

Much have I traveled in the realms of gold and many goodly states and kingdoms seen.

With a great poet the sense of Beauty overcomes every other consideration or rather obliterates all consideration.

A thing of beauty is a joy forever: its loveliness increases, it will never pass into nothingness.

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