Fyodor Dostoevsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky

Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky (11 November 1821 – 9 February 1881), sometimes transliterated Dostoevsky, was a Russian novelist, short story writer, essayist, journalist and philosopher. Dostoyevsky's literary works explore human psychology in the troubled political, social, and spiritual atmosphere of 19th-century Russia, and engage with a variety of philosophical and religious themes.

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To love someone means to see him as God intended him.

What is hell? I maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love.

It is not possible to eat me without insisting that I sing praises of my devourer?

If you were to destroy the belief in immortality in mankind, not only love, but every living force on which the continuation of all life in the world depended, would dry up at once.

We sometimes encounter people, even perfect strangers, who begin to interest us at first sight, somehow suddenly all at once, before a word has been spoken.

Man so long as he remains free has no more constant and agonizing anxiety than find as quickly as possible someone to worship.

Power is given only to those who dare to lower themselves and pick it up. Only one thing matters one thing, to be able to dare!

Sarcasm: the last refuge of modest and chaste-souled people when the privacy of their soul is coarsely and intrusively invaded.

Man is fond of counting his troubles but he does not count his joys. If he counted them up as he ought to he would see that every lot has enough happiness provided for it.

Deprived of meaningful work men and women lose their reason for existence, they go stark raving mad.

The cleverest of all in my opinion is the man who calls himself a fool at least once a month.

It seems in fact as though the second half of a man's life is made up of nothing but the habits he has accumulated during the first half.

Realists do not fear the results of their study.

Man only likes to count his troubles but he does not count his joys.

A real gentleman even if he loses everything he owns must show no emotion. Money must be so far beneath a gentleman that it is hardly worth troubling about.

There is no subject so old that something new cannot be said about it.

If there is no God everything is permitted.

One can know a man from his laugh and if you like a man's laugh before you know anything of him you may confidently say that he is a good man.

The greatest happiness is to know the source of unhappiness.

Men do not accept their prophets and slay them but they love their martyrs and worship those whom they have tortured to death.

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